How Cove can help you tackle those resolutions

Man enjoying Cove

As January rapidly approaches, many of us are considering how to achieve our goals in the new year. Perhaps you’re trying to improve your Zoom presentation skills, exercise more often, or start working on your mental health. Whatever your resolution, it may help to ask yourself: what currently stands between me and these goals? For many, the answer is poor sleep and chronic stress.

Stress often leads to fatigue and an inability to focus on your priorities. It can also cause anxiety, depression, and other health issues that hinder your performance, not to mention your happiness. Similarly, when your sleep suffers, so does your energy, attention, and general wellbeing–a state that doesn’t lend itself to making good on those resolutions.

Cove improves your sleep and reduces your stress, giving you the energy and mental clarity you need to achieve your goals. To maximize these benefits–and crush those resolutions–we recommend trying out some of the performance-boosting habits below.

New year, new self-care routine

Person holding up Cove in front of cycling race

  • Get ahead of stress

Using Cove before a high-stress event can help you calm your nerves and focus your mind. Nervous about that cross-country race? Got the pre-meeting jitters? Toss your Cove in its carrying case so it’s there when you need it.

  • Stand up and Cove

Research shows that being upright can help you think more quickly and clearly.1,2  Likewise, taking a walk during the workday can improve on-the-job energy, concentration, and enjoyment.3 So if you tend to sit all day, try standing up or taking a walk during one of your 20-minute Cove sessions.

Woman having breakfast with Cove

  • Cove over a balanced breakfast

It’s hard to keep your eyes on the prize when you’re distracted by an empty stomach.4,5  Similarly, if you’re stressed out, it can be difficult to concentrate on your goals. Start your morning right by using Cove while you enjoy a nutritious breakfast. With a full stomach and your stress in check, you’ll be able to focus on what matters most to you.

  • Go incommunicado

Texts, emails, and alerts can distract you from the task at hand, whether that’s writing a report or caring for kids. In fact, researchers have found that even being in the same room as your favorite device can impede concentration.6 During Cove sessions, try distancing yourself from your phone to get 20 distraction-free minutes.

Woman reading in bed while using Cove

  • Create a bedtime routine

Sleep gives your brain and body a chance to recover from a hard day’s work. So when you don’t get those critical 7 to 9 hours, your mental and physical performance suffer. Try to establish a calming pre-bed routine and go to sleep at the same time every night. As part of your routine, schedule an evening Cove session within an hour of your bedtime.

This year, resolve to prioritize mental wellness and use your Cove daily. As you start sleeping better and your stress decreases, you’ll find that you have the focus and energy you need to tackle the rest of the resolutions on your list.

 


 

References & additional resources

[1] Friedman, RA. “Standing Up at Your Desk Could Make You Smarter.” New York Times. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/19/opinion/standing-up-at-your-desk-could-make-you-smarter.html

[2] Caron EE, Reynolds MG, Ralph BCW, Carriere JSA, Besner D, Smilek D. Does Posture Influence the Stroop Effect? Psychol Sci. Available at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33017261/

[3] How Walking Enhances Cognitive Performance. Psychology Today. Available at:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/experience-engineering/202001/how-walking-enhances-cognitive-performance.

[4] Bede, PN. “Five Ways Breakfast Can Improve Performance.” Runner’s World. Available at:
https://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-weight-loss/a20801688/five-ways-breakfast-can-improve-performance/

[5] Adolphus K, Lawton CL, Dye L. The effects of breakfast on behavior and academic performance in children and adolescents. Front Hum Neurosci. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3737458/

[6] Adrian F. Ward, Kristen Duke, Ayelet Gneezy, Maarten W. Bos. Brain Drain: The Mere Presence of One’s Own Smartphone Reduces Available Cognitive Capacity. Journal of the Association for Consumer Research. Available at: https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/691462?journalCode=jacr.